Why is it called a “cocktail?”

The mystery is solved — sort of

Ever wonder why it’s called a cocktail? I have, and I set out to learn the answer. So, I checked with Gary (Gaz) Regan, my friend and business associate and, a fountainhead of information about all sorts of booze business matters. He has written 18 books on the business including, 101 best new Cocktails, The Bartender’s Gin Compendium, and The Joy of Mixology.

 It turns out that in the new revised and updated edition of The Joy of Mixology, Gaz addresses this question at the outset of this amazing book, which is full of anecdotes, stories, and cocktail recipes. With his permission here are some excerpts on “How Did a Cocktail Come to be called a Cocktail?

On May 13, 1806, the Balance and Columbian Repository of Hudson, New York, answered a reader’s query as to the nature of a cocktail: “Cocktail is a stimulating liquor, composed of spirits of any kind, sugar, water, and bitters—it is vulgarly called a bittered sling.” The cocktail had been born, it had been defined, and yet it couldn’t have been very well known by the general populace, or the newspaper wouldn’t have considered it a fit topic for elucidation.

Where does the word cocktail come from? There are many answers to that question, and none is really satisfactory. One particular favorite story of mine, though, comes from The Booze Reader: A Soggy Saga of a Man in His Cups, by George Bishop: “The word itself stems from the English cock-tail which, in the middle 1800s, referred to a woman of easy virtue who was considered desirable but impure. The word was imported …

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The Future of the Booze Business

RNDC and LibDib join forces

It was announced recently that Republic National Distributing Co (RNDC), and Liberation Distribution (LibDib) have formed a strategic alliance and will be working together.

I consider this a huge development for the wine and spirits industries and I was anxious to learn what it means for the future. I very much admire Tom Cole of RNDC and Cheryl Murphy Durzy of LibDib and was thrilled to have an exclusive interview with both of them. The three of us talked about how this development came about and what it means for the distribution of both large and small brands.

RNDC is the second largest distributor in the US, operating in 22 markets with a long history dating back to before Prohibition. It is an organization built on the strong foundations of three family-owned companies. What I’ve always admired about RNDC is their values, marketplace effectiveness, and people you enjoy working with.

LibDib is the first technology company to offer a 3-tier compliant model that provides an option for the growing number of makers (suppliers/manufacturers) that are entering the market. Launched in June, 2016 and they describe themselves as: “A wholesale distributor of alcoholic beverages enabled through a web and mobile platform.” (An earlier article I wrote about LibDib is here.)

As reported by Wine and Spirits Daily, LibDib suppliers will be able to use RNDC’s logistics and expand throughout their footprint, while RNDC will have access to LibDib’s technology and data. To me, it is also a union of the traditional and new routes to market.

So, what does this mean?

 

 

According to Tom Cole:

“When I first

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Tom Jago: The Passing of an Industry Icon

The Dean Of Global Spirits

This is from The Last Drop Distillers, a company that Tom co-founded:

It is with profound and heartfelt sadness that we announce the death of our co-founder and inspirational president, Tom Jago, aged 93. Beloved by us all, we give thanks for his brilliance, his incisive humour and, above all, his deep affection for the team and the industry he so loved. Rest in peace, Tom.

Tom Jago. 21st July 1925 – 12th October 2018

There is no one I have met in my booze business journey that I respected more than Tom. He was a true gentleman, a creative genius, and a warm, fun, person. I wrote his story in this blog and in my book and I thought it would be worth re-telling as my personal tribute to a terrific man and friend.

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I first met Tom Jago in the early 1990s when he was part of James Espey’s scotch and cognac team at Seagram. My immediate reaction was, here is a man who is gifted in product development and marketing. He’s also affable and fun to be with. I’m not sure he’s really British.

Over the years he taught me a great deal about the spirits business, above all, how to choose and enjoy good Claret (Bordeaux).

Together with Dr. Espey and Mr. Peter Fleck, he is a principal in the Last Drop Distillers Ltd. (The full story of the company is here.)

Here’s how their website describes Tom:

From a village school in the remote countryside, via a scholarship to Oxford and service in the Royal Navy during WWII, Tom Jago found his niche in the

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